Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME): Neuroblastoma Pathology

September 14, 2018 | 8:00am - 9:00am | Auditorium (180), Lucile Packard Children's Hospital

Pediatric Grand Rounds (CME): Neuroblastoma Pathology

Hiroyuki Shimada, MD, PhD – Keck School of Medicine USC

The Stanford Department of Pediatrics presents the annual Laurence G. Crowley Distinguished Lectureship.

Session Description:

Peripheral neuroblastic tumors (neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroblastoma, and ganglioneuroma) are composed of biologically different groups presenting with a wide range of clinical behaviors; such as spontaneous regression, tumor maturation, and aggressive progression refractory to intensive treatment.  In order to develop effective/efficient treatment protocols, the patients with this disease are stratified into appropriate risk group (Low, Intermediate, or High) based on the combination of so-called prognostic factors including clinical findings (staging and age at diagnosis), histopathology (International Neuroblastoma Pathology Classification – INPC), and molecular/genetic markers (MYCN oncogene status and chromosomal aberrations).  We are now moving towards a new direction of neuroblastoma pathology research from “Looking for More Prognostic Factors” to “Searching for Actionable/Druggable Targets” according to the concept of precision targeting pathway medicine.  Those targets include MYC-family protein (MYC and MYCN) overexpression and abnormal telomere maintenance/elongation [TERT overexpression and ATRX loss leading to ALT (Alternative Lengthening of Telomere)]. They are immunohistochemically evaluable markers and to be incorporated as new subgroups (MYC, TERT, ALT, and Null) in the future INPC.

Education goals for this session:

  • After the presentation, the audience can tell that peripheral neuroblastic tumors are composed of biologically different group. 
  • After the presentation, the audience can tell a new direction of neuroblastoma pathology research in the precise pathway targeting medicine.
  • After the presentation, the audience can describe highly aggressive MYC-driven neuroblastoma defined by augmented MYCN/MYC protein expression with characteristic nucleolar hypertrophy. 
  • After the presentation, the audience can list potential actionable/druggable targets, such as MYC-family protein overexpression, ALK overexpression, TERT overexpression, and ALT phenotype in the Unfavorable Histology Neuroblastomas. 

Full event information: https://events.stanford.edu/events/797/79768

Map URL: http://campus-map.stanford.edu/?id=07-315

Contact Email: pedsgrandrounds@stanford.edu